5 Dangerous Covid Vaccine Myths to Watch Out For

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Epidemiology and medical science will protect us from infectious diseases. Let’s debunk misleading COVID vaccine myths that may set us back.

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The Truth about COVID Vaccine Myths

1. Vaccines Will Give You COVID

male doctor holding syringe covid | myths about covid vaccine

False. COVID vaccines contain cells that already have a memory of how to attack them. But the vaccine does not contain the live virus.

Here’s how vaccines work.

Vaccines provide instructions on how to produce two kinds of white blood cells that know how to fight specific infections. In this case, the COVID-19 virus. These are called the B-lymphocytes and the T-lymphocytes.

  • B-lymphocytes create antibodies that fight the remaining viruses in your bodies
  • T-lymphocytes strike infected cells

With these two kinds of cells in our bodies, our bodies will know how to ward off infections without actually getting them.

Vaccines come with side effects. For example, your body may feel heavy, fatigued, and you may even feel feverish. But this is a sign of your body responding to the vaccine.

2. The COVID Vaccine Will Rewrite My DNA

person holding laboratory flask | side effects of covid vaccine

False. COVID vaccines have nothing to do with your DNA.

It might be confusing because you’ve heard terms like “mRNA” and “genetic material” thrown around. But don’t worry. The CDC reports that COVID vaccines in no way combine with your DNA.

As explained earlier, vaccines provide memories or instructions so our bodies will know how to react to infections like COVID.

mRNA vaccines contain instructions in the form of genetic materials that teach your cells how to make spike proteins, the same ones you’ll find on the outer wall (membrane) of the COVID virus. (Again, this does not mean you will be injected with the actual virus.)

Once your cell creates the protein, your immune system will spot them on the new cell’s surface. And as a natural response to infections (or anything that your immune system knows shouldn’t be there), it will begin to attack. Your immune system will make antibodies that will fight this infection.

In a nutshell, mRNA vaccines use a dummy spike protein that your body can train to fight against. What makes mRNA vaccines different is that instead of injecting you with a weak virus, they teach your immune system to fend against a protein found on the COVID virus.

Viral vectors function similarly but use a different kind of virus, not the COVID virus. Like mRNA vaccines, they tell your cells to create the same spike protein that your immune system will learn to defend against.

Again, FDA-approved COVID vaccines do not have live viruses. In fact, the beauty of vaccines is that you build an immunity to COVID without infection.

3. COVID Vaccines Were Rushed, and Therefore Unsafe

person holding syringe | vaccine covid

False. This is a common misconception. While it may be understandable, it is untrue.

Vaccines still undergo testing. The testing process may be more streamlined, but it is unlikely that they skipped steps.

Even before human clinical trials, companies test vaccines on animals. Once they conclude that it’s safe, they conduct two-month human trials with participants in the tens of thousands.

Better than calling it rushed, the arrival of the COVID vaccine may be timely. The urgent nature of the pandemic called for a quick response, and companies like Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson answered—and with the approval of the FDA.

The FDA and CDC continue to monitor the results as more and more people get vaccinated.

Reported COVID vaccine side effects include:

  • pain, swelling, or redness where you were injected
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • muscle pain
  • nausea
  • chills
  • fever

RELATED: Getting Infected With Covid-19 Changed My Life Forever

4. Vaccinated People Don’t Need To Take Any More Safety Precautions (Masks, Social Distancing, Etc.)

gadgets sterilization disinfection concept man freelancer | myths about covid vaccine

Unlikely. Keep your masks on. They’re still essential in keeping the virus from spreading.

No evidence that tells us that inoculated people cannot spread or get infected with the virus.

Until the government says so, maintain social distancing. Stay home as much as possible, but do wear a mask if you have to go out. And when you do, keep a bottle of alcohol handy.

Wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water as soon as you come home. This can help stop germs at their tracks.

5. COVID Vaccine Myths Related to Pregnancies

pregnant vaccination doctor giving covid 19 | side effects of covid vaccine

There are a few pregnancy-related myths about the COVID vaccine. Let’s go over the most rampant ones.

Infertility

No evidence says that vaccines cause infertility. Men and women that are planning to start a family may get a vaccine. The COVID vaccines may also be safe for pregnant women.

In fact, it might be a good idea. Pregnant women are at a higher risk for a severe case of COVID.

The CDC states that no evidence says that Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson&Johnson Janssen vaccines are dangerous for pregnant women or their babies. The opposite is actually true. There’s swelling evidence that suggests that it’s safe.

Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID Vaccine Containing Fetal Tissue

No, the Janssen COVID vaccine is a viral vector vaccine and does not contain fetal tissue.

Who Is the Best Source of Information about COVID Vaccine and the Myths Surrounding It?

The FDA, CDC, WHO, and licensed healthcare professionals may be the foremost sources of information on COVID-related matters. You may Google your most pressing answers, but trust only proper authorities and perhaps some sites that do science-backed research (such as yours truly).

The FDA and CDC work with pharmaceutical companies to bring consumers up-to-date information. You can find constant updates on their sites. If you’re worried about the latest myths, they are the best agencies to answer your questions.

Preparing to get your vaccine? Here’s what the CDC wants you to know:

I hope this allays some of your fears surrounding the myths about the COVID vaccine. Vaccines are our best bet against infections we don’t know how to cure yet. Vaccines are the best way to protect yourself as well as your loved ones.

No one can force you to get inoculated. It is a personal choice that only you can make. But on the other hand, COVID.

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Are there any other myths that are weighing on your mind? Would you like us to weigh in? Let us know in the comments section below.

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Disclaimer: This article is meant to share information. Do not take this as medical advice.

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